Created by: JackieES
Project

Thick-and-Thin Scarf

I was pushing the limit on my choice of the thinner of the warp threads for this project. But these 2 yarns in my stash “spoke” to me about wanting to play together in this woven scarf. The thinner yarn is Paris Metallic by Ironstone; 52% Acrylic, 31% Rayon, 17% Polyester; 578 yards / 50 grams. The thicker is Siena Wool Blend Ribbon by Tahki Yarns; 48% Viscose rayon 34% Wool, 18% Polyamide nylon; 100 yards / 50 grams. I doubt these yarns are still available, but the specs will help if you might want to make something similar. I also don’t have the 10-dent reed called for in the class materials for this pattern. I used my trustworthy 8-dent with a reduction of one repeat (20 warp ends). This gave me 9” width in the heddle. This definitely did not result in an easy warp for me to manage. The thinner Ironstone yarn is not an ideal warp yarn because it has so much more stretch than the thicker yarn. Would have been ok to just use as weft, but I wanted the effect of the little metallic bulion knots occasionally crossing each other both warp- and weft-wise. I continued to persevere in weaving this even though it is tedious with the differential in warp thread tensions. Also, because of the substantial difference in thickness of the thin vs. thick fabric sections, the warp was becoming too slack in the thin areas as I wound the completed fabric onto the front beam. So to help keep things more even, I wound on cardboard between the layers of fabric at the front beam. With some temporary strategically-placed weights (pennies in old film canisters) at the back of the loom to even out the tension on a few of the misbehaving warp threads, I salvaged the warp well enough to complete weaving to the very end as planned. After removing from the loom, I tied a simple fringe and wet finished in no-rinse fabric conditioner per teacher’s instructions. The fabric is ethereal and I am pleased I have made this. However, I am not sure I would want to tackle it again, at least anytime soon. I love the transparency in the thin areas because the colors in the scarf itself can look so different just by putting it against a different background. Instant coordination with your wardrobe!

You Can Make This

JackieES made Thick-and-Thin Scarf with:

Simply Stunning Scarves

Online Class

Simply Stunning Scarves

with Deborah Jarchow

Project Description

I was pushing the limit on my choice of the thinner of the warp threads for this project. But these 2 yarns in my stash “spoke” to me about wanting to play together in this woven scarf. The thinner yarn is Paris Metallic by Ironstone; 52% Acrylic, 31% Rayon, 17% Polyester; 578 yards / 50 grams. The thicker is Siena Wool Blend Ribbon by Tahki Yarns; 48% Viscose rayon 34% Wool, 18% Polyamide nylon; 100 yards / 50 grams. I doubt these yarns are still available, but the specs will help if you might want to make something similar. I also don’t have the 10-dent reed called for in the class materials for this pattern. I used my trustworthy 8-dent with a reduction of one repeat (20 warp ends). This gave me 9” width in the heddle. This definitely did not result in an easy warp for me to manage. The thinner Ironstone yarn is not an ideal warp yarn because it has so much more stretch than the thicker yarn. Would have been ok to just use as weft, but I wanted the effect of the little metallic bulion knots occasionally crossing each other both warp- and weft-wise. I continued to persevere in weaving this even though it is tedious with the differential in warp thread tensions. Also, because of the substantial difference in thickness of the thin vs. thick fabric sections, the warp was becoming too slack in the thin areas as I wound the completed fabric onto the front beam. So to help keep things more even, I wound on cardboard between the layers of fabric at the front beam. With some temporary strategically-placed weights (pennies in old film canisters) at the back of the loom to even out the tension on a few of the misbehaving warp threads, I salvaged the warp well enough to complete weaving to the very end as planned. After removing from the loom, I tied a simple fringe and wet finished in no-rinse fabric conditioner per teacher’s instructions. The fabric is ethereal and I am pleased I have made this. However, I am not sure I would want to tackle it again, at least anytime soon. I love the transparency in the thin areas because the colors in the scarf itself can look so different just by putting it against a different background. Instant coordination with your wardrobe!

Q&A with JackieES

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Skill Level

Intermediate