Kateri Ewing
Project

Water to Paint Ratio

Share a little about the materials, processes and techniques used to create this piece. We have to remember that painting with watercolour is not so different than learning to play the piano. A lot of if it is repetition and practicing our "scales." Water to paint ratio can be practiced as well. Take a dollop of tube watercolour and put it in the center of your plate. Try to make four different consistencies: • One like weak tea • One like strong tea • One like cranberry juice • One like grape juice Add more pigment, more water as necessary until you reach these consistencies. Then, use a damp wash brush and paint a generous swatch of each onto a piece of practice paper. Note the differences. See where you need to adjust. You should have a variety of strengths of washes, from very pale to very vibrant...but you should still see that paper coming through. I use all four of these strengths in my paintings, usually starting with weak tea washes and building gradually from light to dark. In the photo I have made these four strengths with Phthalo blue. Even the darkest is a very strong colour...it is still transparent and lets the texture of white of the paper shine through. Also, it has enough water in it to avoid streaky paint :) Is the piece for sale? No

You Can Make This

Kateri Ewing made Water to Paint Ratio with:

Improve Your Paintings: Luminous Watercolor Mixing

Online Class

Improve Your Paintings: Luminous Watercolor Mixing

with Kateri Ewing

  • Watercolor

Project Description

Share a little about the materials, processes and techniques used to create this piece. We have to remember that painting with watercolour is not so different than learning to play the piano. A lot of if it is repetition and practicing our "scales." Water to paint ratio can be practiced as well. Take a dollop of tube watercolour and put it in the center of your plate. Try to make four different consistencies: • One like weak tea • One like strong tea • One like cranberry juice • One like grape juice Add more pigment, more water as necessary until you reach these consistencies. Then, use a damp wash brush and paint a generous swatch of each onto a piece of practice paper. Note the differences. See where you need to adjust. You should have a variety of strengths of washes, from very pale to very vibrant...but you should still see that paper coming through. I use all four of these strengths in my paintings, usually starting with weak tea washes and building gradually from light to dark. In the photo I have made these four strengths with Phthalo blue. Even the darkest is a very strong colour...it is still transparent and lets the texture of white of the paper shine through. Also, it has enough water in it to avoid streaky paint :) Is the piece for sale? No

Q&A with Kateri Ewing

Sandra2B asked:
Hi Kateri, this is very helpfull! As I like to sketch 'en plein air' my palette consist of half pans.So no tube paints. How would one obtain the richest value using pans?
Kateri Ewing answered:
Pans are great to use and I find it helps to spritz them with a bit of water and let them soften a bit before I begin painting. You can get very rich colour from pans. Just let them soften and make to sure to load enough pigment on your brush :)
Claudelle asked:
This is a good practice and having a visual of it is wonderful, also mentioning that at each level it's important to see the paper through it is a useful tip I hadn't heard yet. Thanks again, Kateri!
Kateri Ewing answered:
You are so welcome. I am glad!