Crocheting Blog

10 Different Tunisian Crochet Stitches You’ve Got to Try

Have you tried Tunisian crochet before? It’s a totally unique needle craft. In fact, you can be an expert at both knitting and crochet and still not be familiar with the different Tunisian crochet stitches.

Fortunately, if you’re already a crocheter or knitter, learning the Tunisian crochet technique is a breeze. The end of the Tunisian hook looks just like a crochet hook, and you’ll find that some knitting skills will translate right over to Tunisian crochet.

Tunisian Crochet Class

Beginner’s Guide to Tunisian Crochet

Combine the best of two needlecrafts to create three cozy accessories that look like they’re knit — all using a single crochet hook! Get the Class

Check out a few of the most popular Tunisian crochets stitches here! Which is your favorite?

Setup row

While this might not technically be a stitch, you have to somehow get those stitches on your Tunisian hook, right? Every Tunisian crochet project begins with a setup row.

Tunisian crochet setup row

No matter what stitch you choose to do in your Tunisian crochet, the setup row is almost always exactly the same. The setup row begins like crochet, chaining a certain number of stitches. However, once you begin working into the chains you’ll find that unlike crochet, the loops you work with will stay on the hook as you work the row. Ever wondered why a Tunisian crochet hook is so long? It’s because you need it to hold all those loops!

In addition to helping you begin your project, making a foundation row can also give you a neat, professional-looking finish on the edge of your work.

Tunisian simple stitch

Tunisian crochet headband

Make this headband in Tunisian Crochet for Beginners!

Tunisian simple stitch is doesn’t look like any knit or crochet stitch you’ve ever seen, but it’s sort of the bread and butter of Tunisian crochet. It’s first stitch most beginners learn in Tunisian crochet — it’s called “simple stitch” for a reason!

Tunisian Simple stitch two color cowl

Both the headband and cowl above were made with the Tss in our Tunisian Crochet for Beginners class. The simple stitch is great for projects like these because it creates a nice dense fabric that offers plenty of warmth. Depending on the yarn and hook you use, it can be fairly sturdy or have a lovely drape.

Because this stitch is quite straightforward, it also gives you a great opportunity to experiment with color and texture.

Tunisian reverse stitch

Boot cuffs made with Tunisian reverse stitch

Tunisian reverse stitch is very similar to Tunisian simple stitch, except that it’s worked from the back of the work instead of the front. Tunisian crocheters should first master Tunisian simple stitch before trying the reverse stitch.

Tunisian reverse stitch creates a little ridge in the work, making it a great option for adding texture to your project. It’s also great for colorwork when you’re working with multiple colors.

Tunisian knit stitch

Tunisian crochet knit stitch swatch

Did you know that you can create a stitch that looks knitted using your Tunisian crochet hook? Tunisian knit stitch looks deceptively a lot like stockinette stitch in knitting on the front. But, flip it over to the back, and you’ll see that it’s a bit different. The wrong side of the work is the key to spotting the difference between a knit stitch in knitting and a knit stitch in Tunisian crochet.

The Tunisian knit stitch can be used on any type of project, from garments to accessories. It looks especially nice combined with ribbing (more on that below!).

Tunisian purl stitch

Tunisian purl stitch

If you’re working with just one color in Tunisian purl stitch, your stitches will look similar to the Tunisian reverse stitch. However, if you’re using more than one color, the Tunisian purl stitch will look completely different. So, of course, this stitch is perfect for when you’re working on something that uses several different colors.

The Tunisian purl stitch is a little trickier than other Tunisian stitches, just because of the finagling it takes to get your hook in and out of the stitches. But once you master the Tps, you can combine stitches to create lots of new designs.

Tunisian 2×2 rib

Tunisian crochet ribbed hat

A seasoned knitter might be able to discern the difference between a knitted rib and a Tunisian crochet rib, but nobody else will be able to tell your 2×2 ribbing wasn’t knitting! This fabric combines the Tks and Tps (just like how knitted ribbing combines knits and purls) to create a really stretch fabric that brings a touchable texture to your projects.

Tunisian double crochet

Tunisian double crochet

Almost any crochet stitch can be translated over to Tunisian crochet, and the double crochet is one of those stitches. Like double crochet, Tunisian double crochet creates a taller, more open stitch that’s ideal for when you don’t want to create a super tight fabric. The loose stitches of Tunisian double crochet can help create garments with a very nice drape.

Tunisian full stitch

Scarf made with tunisian simple stitch

If you’re after a fluffy fabric that you can’t help but touch, go for the Tunisian full stitch. This stitch looks perhaps more woven than any other stitch, and it creates different textures on the front and back — perfect for scarves and other reversible projects.

Tunisian honeycomb stitch

Tunisian honeycomb stitch

The honeycomb stitch really dials it up on the texture! Mixing Tks and Tps creates a lace-like surface with little pools of recessed fabric that mimic a honeycomb. You can learn how to recreate this stitch here

Tunisian basket weave stitch

Tunisian Basketweave

You can create a basket weave texture in knitting, crocheting and Tunisian crocheting! Simply alternate blocks of the Tks and the Tps to create lots of contrast.

Tunisian Crochet Class

Beginner’s Guide to Tunisian Crochet

Combine the best of two needlecrafts to create three cozy accessories that look like they’re knit — all using a single crochet hook! Get the Class

16 Comments

jennifer smart

I am currently trying the Tunisian crochet and I am totally hooked,can’t get enough of it I want to learn all I can

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Marillyn Nystrom

I accidentally discovered a Tunisian crochet pattern book while browsing the yarn department at hobby lobby and decided to try it. I’ve been an avid crocheter for more than 60 years. I am totally fascinated with this new (to me) Tunisian craft. Have finished my first project – a baby afghan for a great grandbaby, and am working on my second one. Love it!

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Joanie Parfinski

I am so interested in learning the Tunisian Crochet Stitches

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Joanie Parfinski

I will look for pattern book in Hobby Lobby.

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linda

I just made a scarf but I’m a little confused on how to make it wider being as though the needle is only so long..

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Kayla

I’ve just finished one project using a normal crochet hook with a rubberband used as an end stop. It gets pretty squashed, but I could fit 40 stitches of worsted weight on a N hook without the end result looking odd.

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Rebecca

I know of two ways to make wider Tunisian projects.

The first involves sewing sections together. I am about to complete a very large blanket made in three sections. Each section is in simple Tunisian stitch, made with blocks of color. Each section has a simple border, of single then extended double crochet. Then I will join the sections together. I was able to get more than 60 stitches for the wider middle section using a standard J Tunisian hook.

The second way to make wider Tunisian projects is the same way they make wider knit projects. They actually make a Tunisian hook with a plastic string and stopper on one end, and the long tunisian needle with crochet hook on the other . . . like the knitting needles for wider projects. Amazon sells a set of different sizes for under $10.

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Rebecca

Just learned a third way. You can actually do the second panel while combining it to the first at the same time, for a smooth, seamless transition. Youtube has great tutorials.

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Kris

I bought simple wooden dowels and used a crocher hook to make the stitches both onto and off of the dowel. I am currently making a project that is around 2 and 1/2 feet wide with the dowel. I have also used a small piece of PVC pipe as well.

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Anne

You can use a double-ended Tunisian hook and two balls of yarn instead of one. That will allow you to make your work as wide as you like.

Using a double-ended Tunisian hook (i.e. a hook with a hook on both ends, instead of having a hook on one end and a stopper on the other) means that you can work small sections at a time, instead of having to keep all the stitches on the hook at once. Search Youtube for “bedspread technique crochetnit” to see a video demonstration.

You will work the forward pass with one end of the hook using yarn 1, and then you will turn the work around and work the return pass from the back with the other end of the hook, using yarn 2.

As well as using a double-ended hook to make very large garments such as blankets, you can also use double-ended hooks to make reversible fabrics that look the same on both sides and have no “wrong” side. Also, a double-ended hook allows you to work in the round and make a seamless tube, that is useful for making gloves, snoods, hats, etc.

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Wanda

the Interchangeable crochet hook sets – or the one that already have the chord and button or stopper – you can get them also in bamboo ,-aluminum, plastic etc. all the companies their is another type of hook called a cro-hook – they call that double sided , two -sided Denise has a big set of interchangeable’s and she give 2 hooks the same size for each size it’s 20 hooks. the cro- if you haven’t ever seen one is a long Tunisian hook and instead of a stopper on the other end there’s another hook and that’s a real neat way to work with two color’s you can almost forget finding these hooks in any craft store, your best bet is the net . Crafsy has it here under hooks and notions. Hope I helped a little hahaha I love to yack a lot

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Madelein Botha

I have been looking and asking everywhere. How can I do a fillet graph with a tunisian hook. Like making spaces and filling spaces.? To form a picture anybody who tried this?

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Rebecca

Do you mean changing colors to do an image? From what I understand, it’s very easy to do images with Tunisian. I read if its 1-2 stitches, you just carry the yarn along. If it’s more than two stitches, drop the color and sew in the tail later. There are some fantastic examples out there.

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Deanna

You can also do cross stitch on tunisian utilizing the vertical bars (after your project is complete. I love the versatility of tunisian and the soft hand (like knit!). I only crochet. My mom taught me lefty, then my sister taught me righty (knitting) and then I was confused!!!! Crochet – one hook, I’m good! LOL

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Anne

You probably already got help by now and/or are not following this thread anymore, but just in case you’re still there (and maybe this can help others as well):

You need to make a combination of tunisian double crochet and holes (they probably have a name, but I don’t know what else to call them right now). To make holes, you just cast on like you do in knitting, when you’re done (with let’s say casting on 2) you continue like normal with the rest of the row, but you skip the 2 stitches you cast on. You can work through these cast-on stitches like normal ones. Then you just make your picture using this technique.

Hope this is somewhat clear 🙂

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Karen Berry

Ran into the Tunisian crochet. And loved the way it felt. I’ve made a king size afghan for my grandson using a J afghan hook 14 inches long. I found I could get 120 stitches on the hook . to make it easier to keep track that no stitches were loss , I used a 6 inch long piece of yarn woven back and forth going vertically every 20 stitches. Has helped me pin point exactly where I skipped or accidentally worked. 2 stitches together. Still working on how to join panels without having a visible break in the blanket between panels. Currently tie-ing the ends in on my 2 kings size afghan and have started a 3rd. Takes me about 2 years to a king size project as get side tracked with new smaller afghan for new great grand babies that need theirs relatively immediately.
Interested in how to connect panels without and obvious “seam line”.
Can cables be done like the cables found in knitting? Can cold o rd be changed in the work to show a decoration pattern like in knitting using several colors? How about working a name in, using a different color, in while doing the panel? For example a lap afghan using colors of a wedding and showing names and date of the event?

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