Crocheting Blog

The Key to Crocheting More Texture

There are loads of ways to add texture to your crochet projects, and post stitches show up in so many of those techniques. Post stitches can create crochet cables, ribbing, basketweave stitching and so much more. 

Front Post Double Crochet Stitches

What are post stitches?

Normally in crochet, we work stitches through the top of the stitch, the little V on the top edge of the fabric where you insert your hook. The bottom part of the stitch — the part that actually makes up the fabric — is what we call a “post.”

When crocheting post stitches, you’ll work each stitch around a post instead of into the top of the stitch. You’ll insert your hook into the space between the posts of the previous row.

There are two ways to make post stitches and using either or a combination of both can have different effects on your designs. For simplicity’s sake, we’ll demonstrate both techniques with double crochets stitches, but the same method can work for any stitch.

Front post crochet stitches

The front post double crochet creates a stitch that’s raised up from the fabric. Here’s how to work it.

Step 1:

Insert hook around post from front of work

Yarn over. From the front of the work, insert the hook from right to left around the post of the next stitch.

Step 2:

making a front post double crochet stitch

Yarn over and pull a loop so that you have three loops on your hook

Step 3:

One finished front post double crochet stitch

Yarn over and pull through the first two loops; yarn over again and pull through remaining two loops.

Another way to think about it is you are inserting your hook from front to back, then back to the front and working the stitch as normal.

On subsequent rows, you may end up working a post stitch around a previous post stitch. It sounds confusing, but it’s actually a lot easier to see the posts once they are raised.

Back post crochet stitches

back post double crochet stitches

The back post double crochet creates a stitch that’s raised on the wrong side of the fabric. Here’s how to stitch it.

Step 1:

Insert hook around back post

Yarn over, then from the back of the work, insert the hook from right to left around the post of the next stitch.

Step 2:

Making a back post double crochet stitch

Yarn over and pull a loop through so that you have three loops on your hook.

Step 3:

finishing a front post double crochet stitch

Yarn over and pull through the first two loops; yarn over again and pull through remaining two loops.

For this post stitch, you insert your hook from back to front, then to the back and complete the stitch.

When to put your post stitches to work

Ribbing

Crocheted rib jar cover

You can create a ribbing by alternating the front post and back post stitches. Ribbing looks good at the brim of hats or on the edge of gloves, socks and even cowls. Above is a mason jar cozy created with alternating front and back post double crochet stitches.

Cables

Crochet Cable Swatch

Cables aren’t just limited to knitting! You can use post stitches in a variety of ways to achieve beautiful cables in your work. Try it out with this swatch pattern and tutorial.

More textures

Basketweave crochet swatch

The basketweave stitch alternates groups of front and back post stitches to produce a woven design. It looks great on blankets and accessories!

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4 Comments

savitasampson

Since a front post dc is shorter than a regular dc, you should start and end the row with a regular hdc (and not a regular dc as shown above). Otherwise, the ends will flare out.

Reply
kim quinn

thank you! making a blanket for my daughter using all front and back post dc. she loves the springy feel of the ridges. was chaining 3 at the end and as you say, they do curve out. half done already and it is 30″ long so will continue as no time to rip out and begin anew. am fairly new to crochet. would you edge around the entire piece after? if so, using what stitch? thanks again.

Reply
Karen

I have a pattern that says to (fpdc,dc) in each DC. I can’t figure out what exactly that means.

Reply
Karen

I know how to do both those stitches just not together in the same stitch. Has anyone seen this technique?

Reply

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